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Pass

Explanation
a pass book or a dompas that every black person over the age of 16 was required to carry, indicating whether they had the right to be in any given area, and for how long.

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‘Kaffir! Waar’s jou pas?’ [Where’s your pass?] // ’17 745 741 people arrested.’
‘Kaffir! Waar’s jou pas?’ [Where’s your pass?] // ’17 745 741 people arrested’ // If I think about that I feel my heart inside and my brains is like water, boiling. // And now was trying to make the people refugees of South Africa. // Sorry to say it but when I try to think about us, I ...
... Joe Mamasela and Almond Nofemela. The following sections provide a profile on Truth Commissioner Dr. Wendy Orr and histories of the hostel and pass law systems. Also included is an interview with international TRC expert Priscilla Hayner who points out features unique to the South African ...
Reference book, pass book, dompas, stinker, different names for the same thing. The hated document that determined the life of every black South African for decades, where they could sleep, live, work, visit and for how long. The main aim of the pass laws was to control the movement of black South ...
... Champion Galele, on the banks of the Fish River where their remains were disposed of by the police. The following segment focuses on the history of pass laws, described as the greatest single human rights violation of our past. ...
The millions of people arrested for pass law offenses passed through special commissioner’s courts presided over by so-called Bantu or Native Commissioners. The sentences varied from fines to floggings. Usually offenders were endorsed out, meaning they had 72 hours to leave the area.
The millions of people arrested for pass law offences passed through special commissioner’s courts presided over by so-called Bantu or Native Commissioners. The sentences varied from fines to floggings. Usually offenders were endorsed out, meaning they had 72 hours to leave the area.
Pass laws denied black South Africans the right of citizenship. They were aliens in their own country. Pass law arrests gave millions of South Africans a criminal record; criminals for simply not having a valid pass to be in a certain place at a certain time in the country of their birth. Black ...
Pass laws denied black South Africans the right of citizenship. They were aliens in their own country. Pass law arrests gave millions of South Africans a criminal record, criminals for simply not having a valid pass to be in a certain place at a certain time in the country of their birth. Black ...
The 1950s saw wide spread resistance against the carrying of passes, a document which severely restricted the movement of Africans in the country of their birth. Hundreds of thousands of people were jailed for not carrying a valid passport. In 1952 the ANC launched a deliberate campaign of civil ...
Pass Laws
Pass Laws
But throughout the time of the pass laws there was always fierce resistance. It reached a peak in the Defiance Campaign of 1952 when people deliberately destroyed their passes and when a huge protest march of women took place to the Union Buildings in Pretoria. In the sixties it was again an ...
But throughout the time of the pass laws there was always fierce resistance. It reached a peak in the Defiance Campaign of 1952 when people deliberately destroyed their passes and when a huge protest march of women took place to the Union Buildings in Pretoria. In the sixties it was again an ...
Reference book, pass book, dompas, stinker, different names for the same thing. The hated document that determined the life of every black South African for decades, where they could sleep, live, work, visit and for how long. The main aim of the pass laws was to control the movement of black South ...
... go to the café here next door and you meet up with a … inspector, and then the only thing he is going to say, ‘jong kom hie’ waar’s jou pass?’ [Where’s your pass?] No, I’ve left it here at work or here at home. ‘Kom, kom, kom.’ [Come, come, come] Then they take you to the ...
... 1700s the white settlers in South Africa forced slaves to carry identity books so that they could control their movements. In some way or another pass books had existed since then. But when the National Party came into power in 1948 and formalized the ideology of apartheid they needed more ...
on an Eastern Cape hotel in 1992 and the death of 11 commuters during the 1983 Mdansane bus boycott. But we start in the Cape Peninsula. The dreaded pass book had always determined where black South Africans lived and worked but in the Western Cape the law also reserved the area for white and ...
If you are eighteen years of age they say, where’s your pass? It’s in the house there, I’m going there… No! You are supposed to carry your pass with you. They lock you and you are going to pay the fine at the police station. It was not something which we were allowed to leave with, you must ...
If you are 18 years of age they say, where’s your pass? It’s in the house there, I’m going there… No! You are supposed to carry your pass with you. They lock you and you are going to pay the fine at the police station. It was not something which we were allowed to leave with, you must carry ...
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