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Sharpeville massacre

Explanation
On 21 March 1960, 69 people died when police opened fire on unarmed marchers protesting against the Pass laws at Sharpeville, Tvl. The march formed part of an anti-Pass campaign organised by the PAC. That same day, a similar march took place in Langa, Cape Town, resulting in three deaths from police shootings. A national state of emergency was declared on 24 March, lasting until 31 August. Nearly 12 000 people were detained. Just over a fortnight after the massacre, the ANC and PAC were banned.

other big industries. Also home to millions of people who work at these industries and their families. They live in grim townships such as Sebokeng, Sharpeville, Bophelong and Boipatong. For some, mostly men from KwaZulu-Natal, this is only a temporary home. They live in hostels and their families ...
other big industries. Also home to millions of people who work at these industries and their families. They live in grim townships such as Sebokeng, Sharpeville, Bophelong and Boipatong. For some, mostly men from KwaZulu-Natal, this is only a temporary home. They live in hostels and their families ...
... seized liberation movements. On the continent African Uhuru boldly took shape and back home the South African state bared its teeth. The 1960s Sharpeville massacre started a period of open state terror. The 90 day detention law was passed on May 1, 1963. A series of arrests began soon after. ...
... when police shot and killed at least 19 people, though the community claims the number dead could be as high as 43. It was the 25th anniversary of Sharpeville, but to the people of Uitenhage that day marks the beginning of a year’s long binge of violence, the memory of which is still ...
 
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